BAATN Annual Conference

Growth through adversity: Reflections on COVID19, Racism & Resilience

Saturday 10 April 2021 – 9:45 for a 10:00 start till 16.15

 (This is a BAATN members-only online event)

This is a Closed Practitioner Event

This virtual-conference is another rare opportunity to come together, share our knowledge, tell our stories, feel connected and gain mutual support and inspiration. It’s also a place to see old friends and gain new ones.

What a year of adversity 2020 was with Covid19, the death of George Floyd and Brexit. All issues that continue to affect our lives in the year of 2021. These health, social and political issues affect us psychologically, somatically and spiritually. This level of adversity is not new for Africans, Asians and Caribbean peoples. So how do we as therapists, remind, support and guide our clients and ourselves to grow through all these adversities?

At this conference, we will be reflecting on both trauma and resilience during these unprecedented times.

This conference is for paid-up BAATN members of African, Asian and Caribbean heritage. You can sign up for membership here

Date: 10th April 2021
Time: 9:45 for a 10:00 start – end 16.15
Online Zoom event 
Cost: Members only £20 and £10 student.

You can pay via BACS using our BACS Payment Form. Please do not send money if you are not a paid-up member of BAATN.

You can also pay with your PayPal account: Please state in the note box that you are paying for the Growth through adversity event –  https://www.paypal.me/baatn

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10.00 Start
10.05

Introduction to the conference.

Update on BAATN and developments.

10.20 A mindfulness moment – Dennis Carney.
10.35 First Speaker: Carmen Joanne Ablack (20 mins to speak 10 mins for questions)
11.05 Break (15 mins)
11.20 Second Speaker: Ayesha Aslam (20 mins to speak 10 mins for questions) 
11.50 Third Speaker: Dwight Turner (20 mins to speak 10 mins for questions)
12.20 Questions to the 3 main speakers
12.30 Lunch
13.30 Achievements and celebrations
13.45 Themed and open workshops (1 hour 30 mins)
15.15 Break
15.30 Plenary, noticeboard and ending ritual
16.15 End

 

Main Speakers

Ayesha Aslam

Adversities creating changes in our lives

Sakoon Counselling Services is an organisation that combines mainstream models with spirituality/diversity when working with individuals, couples and families. The Global Pandemic impacted us in so many different ways.  We had to manage these adversities individually and collectively. In this talk, I will share our experiences of how we managed our work and supported our communities during these challenging times of Covid-19 from a professional and personal context.

About Ayesha

Ayesha is the Director and founder of Sakoon Counselling Services. She is an international Speaker, Accredited Psychotherapist, Systemic Practitioner and an Islamic counsellor. She has over 16 years of experience working with diverse issues from counselling to more severe psychological issues.

She is a pioneer, a first, who took diversity into consideration with the inclusion of faith in the counselling process, in particular the Islamic faith. Today Sakoon has 10 counsellors, 3 trainers, accredited training courses and clients as far as Phoenix Arizona and Australia.

She has received an award for her dedication for Islam and Mental Health.

Carmen Joanna Ablack

Extending self-care into reflective resilience practice
 
In this workshop participants will be invited to move, to use their voices and to connect more deeply with their capacity to self-care and to self-reflect. If you intend attending Carmen’s workshop, please ensure you wear clothing you can move in and that you have some floor space to move in that is covered by your camera.

The workshop will include us spending time in inner and interpersonal zones of experiencing, as well as paying attention to how be with the impact of the outer world.

About Carmen

Carmen Joanne Ablack Integrative and Body Psychotherapist, Gestalt Psychotherapist, Group Psychotherapist and Supervisor. National and international teaching includes diversity and intersectionality, relational Body Psychotherapy and Gestalt – somatic trauma, groupwork, couples and relationship therapy. Offers supervision, training, coaching and mentoring in diversity, embodied relational practice, and mental health.

Publications include a chapter in Contemporary Body Psychotherapy: The Chiron Approach, articles including Introduction to Body Psychotherapy; Body Psychotherapy, Trauma and the Black Woman Client. Recently: Finding our Intercultural Ground  in International Journal of Body Psychotherapy Vol.18,2, 2019/20 and a chapter in Intercultural Therapy (2019) (eds Ababio, B. & Littlewood, R.)

Carmen is currently President of European Association for Body Psychotherapy and member of the Black, African & Asian Therapy Network Leadership Group, where she also sits on the External Relations Group.

Dr Dwight Turner

Sisyphus Rising: Can we fight the White Supremacist in our dreams?

2020 will probably go down as the most tumultuous year in most of our lifetimes. The murder of George Floyd and the subsequent protests against racism and abuse around the world, and how these impacts of the past several months upon clients and practitioners has led us all to question our intersecting identities. In my mind, it is no coincidence that race, racism and civil rights have risen to the forefront of our professions as psychologists and psychotherapists, and in particular the specific focus upon White Supremacy and its weekly, hourly, minute by minute impact upon and within the racial other.
In this presentation, I will therefore consider the role damaging role unconscious White Supremacy plays within our psyches, and in particular in the dreamscape.  This talk then becomes a call towards encouraging counsellors to be brave in the work we do of personal, relational, and cultural transformation by decolonising their internalised supremacist.

About Dwight
Dr Dwight Turner is Senior Lecturer within the School of Applied Social Sciences at the University of Brighton, lecturing on their PG Dip and MSc courses in Counselling and Psychotherapy, a PhD Supervisor at their Doctoral College, a psychotherapist and supervisor in private practice.  His latest book Intersections of Privilege and Otherness in Counselling and Psychotherapy was released in February 2021 and is published by Routledge. An activist, writer and public speaker on issues of race, difference and intersectionality in counselling and psychotherapy, Dr Turner can be contacted via his website www.dwightturnercounselling.co.uk and can be followed on Twitter at @dturner300

Workshop Facilitators


Dennis Carney

‘Last night a DJ saved my life!!”

Missing your times on the dance floor? Are your dancing shoes covered in cobwebs? Then this is the workshop for you. Dust off your dancing shoes and get ready to boogie and shake your hips to some classic dance floor tunes. There will also be lots of opportunities to share your experiences of the healing power of music with your peers.

About Dennis

Dennis is a member of the BAATN Leadership Team and over the last three decades, Dennis has developed and facilitated personal development workshops aimed at Black gay & bisexual men, that explore themes around identity, self-esteem, assertiveness, relationships and sexual health.

15 years ago, Dennis trained in Humanistic Psychotherapy at Spectrum. For almost 15 years, Dennis has worked as a part-time lecturer at The City Literary Institute, and currently delivers short courses on Anger Management, Group Facilitation, Gestalt and also facilitates Personal Groups for counselling students. 

Dennis is a founder partner of Loving Men, established in the early nineties to develop personal development events aimed at Gay men around the UK. Dennis also works as a freelance staff trainer, designing and delivering training programmes for Care Quality Commission,  Social Care Institute for Excellence, West London Mental Health Trust, London Borough of Tower Hamlets, Choice FM Radio and several other satisfied clients.

Dennis appeared in the Channel 4 documentary ‘Reggae, Trainers & Olympics’ which explored the role of dancehall music and homophobia and was also an official spokesperson for the Stop Murder Music Campaign. Dennis has also received two Black LGBT Community Awards in recognition of his work with QTPOC communities in the UK

Ashima Kumar

‘Doodle art to build resistance’

The Doodle art* workshop will create a foundation for building resilience by focusing your mind on the ‘here’ and ‘now’. It will provide a creative outlet from the realm of analytical thinking into the realm of silence, reverie, and heightened awareness.
You will be introduced to the technique of drawing inspiration from nature, translating the complex shapes into simple line drawings using logic and creativity, igniting the dormant aspects of your brain resulting in a calm self.

* Doodle Art is based on a universal reality that we all have an artist within us. In fact, drawing was one of the earliest modes of communication for human beings. Yet, in the process of growing up, most of us lose touch with the artist within us. Doodle art re –awakens that artist and helps us explore aspects of ourselves through simple and representational icons. Doodle art is “thoughts which arise” from the unconscious- it is an interpretation of our deeply and unconsciously held beliefs and thought processes. It helps you dig deep into your memory to bring forth new ideas and expressions.  It’s an art form that doesn’t involve much of our conscious mind. However, if a little more thought or effort is put into the drawing, one can create an artwork that can be interpreted, just like a language.

The participants will have to organise some basic material for the workshop

  1. Plain paper
  2. Black fine liner pen (black gel pen will be fine)
  3. Coloured pens (optional)

Should you need any more information or want to edit the content please let me know.

 

Beth Collier

Nature as secure base: Trauma, healing and relationship

“Nature offers us the core conditions of a primary care giver and is a significant other in our lives. There is a trauma in being disconnected from her as a source of positive attachment and as a secure base. Many Black and Asian people have been disenfranchised from nature through human interference. In the UK context experiences of racism have created barriers for some, to feeling safe in nature, cutting us off from a source of physiological, emotional, spiritual embodied support.

Black and Asian people are more likely to live in urban areas with a deficiency of access to nature, without a buffer to the stresses of urban life.”  Beth Collier

 This workshop considers the role nature has played in supporting well-being during the coronavirus outbreak and the racial reckoning. We’ll explore racial disparities in accessing nature including themes of loss, trauma, repair and healing, as well as the therapeutic benefits of nature and how this can be brought into client work.

About Beth

Beth is a Nature Allied Psychotherapist and ethnographer, teaching woodland living skills and natural history.

Beth grew up rurally, on a smallholding, immersed in nature. Her work explores interpersonal relationships between people and nature.

As a therapist Beth works exclusively in natural settings and has developed Nature Allied Psychotherapy as a modality for an ongoing client practice, working relationally at depth in allegiance with nature to explore our relationship with the natural world as well as exploring our human social relationships.

Beth specialises in working with relational trauma in our connections with people and with nature. She provides professional training for psychotherapists and well-being professionals through the Nature Therapy School.  Her upcoming book, Nature Allied Psychotherapy: Exploring Relationships with Self, Others and Nature will be published by Routledge.

Beth is founder/Director of Wild in the City, an organisation supporting the well-being of people of colour through connection with nature, offering experiences in woodland living skills, natural history, hiking and ecotherapy; using the skills of our ancestors to nurture a deeper connection with the natural world and a sense of belonging to communities past and present.

As a naturalist her work aims to reignite the oral tradition for learning about nature within families and challenges racism within the environmental sector. As a researcher her ethnography has documented people of colours relationship with nature in the UK, the development of cultures which shun nature and white attitudes towards black presence in green spaces.

Beth’s practice has been featured in BBC Cities, Nature’s New Wild, Ep3 Outcasts, BBC Countryfile and Therapy for Black Girls. Her writing has been published by The Ecologist, Runnymede Trust, Media Diversified, Blavity and Nesta.

She is a Fellow of the National Association for Environmental Education and is a member of Natural England’s Nature Recovery Network Management Group. 

Keeley Taverner

Caring for ourselves while caring for others – Confronting guilt

Does guilt get the best of you?

Does guilt have you saying yes, when you really want to say no?

Do you struggle to overcome your strong guilt reaction?

If so, join this breakout workshop on Confronting guilt.  The challenges of the pandemic has resulted in an increased need for carers to care both in their professional and personal world. Guilt is a profound emption and can feel so intense attempts to change can be stunted.  Carers / therapists / clients can often struggle with feelings of guilt and all too easily people can get caught in a cycle of resentment and guilt – resentful that their life is no longer their own, and guilty for feeling like this.

Inspired by Dr Gabor Mate’s video, When the body says no – caring for ourselves while caring for others.  We will take sometime to explore the guilt reaction and the importance of befriending this emotion to better understand its hidden meaning.

About Keeley

Keeley Taverner is a British-Jamaican psychotherapist that started adulthood as a mother of two working as a cashier at Ikea while feeling trapped in an abusive relationship with a narcissist partner. Raised by her single mother on a London council estate where “schools housed us rather than engineer our minds for success”, she left school with no qualifications, prospects, ambition or self-belief. From women’s refuge to fighting for a place at a university to working with high-risk offenders, to running her own practice, Key For Change, Keeley has boldly, passionately and courageously defied the odds — and now she’s on a mission to help others do the same.

Salma Darling, MA

Mindfulness for Developing Greater Insight, Awareness and Building Resilience in Challenging Times

This informative and experiential session will support us as therapists to mindfully engage with body, mind and relationships to develop insight, awareness and build resilience in challenging times. As we develop our skills in mindfulness and compassion, we are more able to support our clients to also engage with mindful embodiment to navigate challenge or adversity, to emerge stronger and wiser.
The session suitable for those new to and experienced in mindfulness.

About Salma

Salma is a mindfulness trainer, body-oriented psychotherapist and conscious dance facilitator and has been teaching mindfulness alongside clinical practice as a body-oriented psychotherapist since 2001, in NHS mental health services, non-profits and corporations in the UK and USA.
She teaches mindfulness to a cross-section of clients who have included American Express, Unilever, University College London, Brighton University, Journey Meditation New York, Heartcamp San Francisco, Meru Health Helsinki and London Mindful.
Salma trained in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA with Dr Jon Kabat-Zinn, and in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Mindfulness Supervision at Bangor University UK.
Salma has practiced meditation since 1989, with many months in silent retreats and monasteries in the Theravada Buddhist tradition, before becoming a single mama to twins during the pandemic.

www.wilddivinedance.com     www.mindfulnessconsultancy.com

Carmen Joanne Ablack (one of the three main speakers)

Extending self-care into reflective resilience practice

In this workshop participants will be invited to move, to use their voices and to connect more deeply with their capacity to self-care and to self-reflect. If you intend attending Carmen’s workshop, please ensure you wear clothing you can move in and that you have some floor space to move in that is covered by your camera. 

The workshop will include us spending time in inner and interpersonal zones of experiencing, as well as paying attention to how be with the impact of the outer world.

About Carmen

Carmen is a member of the BAATN Leadership Team and  an integrative body psychotherapist, supervisor, trainer and consultant working with individuals, groups, couples and organisations. A trained mediator and coach she is accredited also as a Senior Manager by the Institute of Healthcare Management. Her theoretical, clinical, consultancy and teaching experience includes integrative and relational approaches; gestalt body psychotherapy; intercultural, sexual and diversity work; working with creativity and performance; somatic trauma therapy and transpersonal approaches in the psychological therapies.

Carmen has taught psychotherapy, counselling and other psychological approaches to therapy since the 1980’s ( UK and abroad). She is a regular keynote speaker. She has been published on psychotherapy theory, contemporary practice, regulation and governance. A member of the UKCP psychotherapy council, she is also an EABP board member.

Ayesha Aslam (one of the three main speakers)

‘Adversity creating changes in our lives”

About Ayesha 

Ayesha is the Director and founder of Sakoon Counselling Services. She is an international Speaker, Accredited Psychotherapist, Systemic Practitioner and an Islamic counsellor. She has over 16 years of experience working with diverse issues from counselling to more severe psychological issues.

She is a pioneer, a first, who took diversity into consideration with the inclusion of faith in the counselling process, in particular the Islamic faith. Today Sakoon has 10 counsellors, 3 trainers, accredited training courses and clients as far as Phoenix Arizona and Australia.

She has received an award for her dedication for Islam and Mental Health.

“The conference provided a rare moment of connection, recognition, powerful truth and soothing – thank you” – Patmarie

“The significance of a powerful and growing black presence within the therapy workforce. Maybe this needs to be represented within UKCP & BACP at all levels of these organisations.”

“Given the dehumanising, frustrating, and draining experience of various forms of oppression, I think it is extremely important and needed to have a conference on self-care and action, in a space that feels safe and holding. Appreciative of BAATN’s initiative on this.”Pedro

“It was an enriching experience. The people I met in the breakaway group were full of passion and energy. They were respectful and professional. I find Baatn to be an amazing and supportive organisation.”Michelle O’Neill

“We need more conferences like this more than once a year be it virtual or in person. BAATN has created a truly nourishing event that should be experienced more frequently for it’s people of colour.”

“Sharing experiences we are all impacted by was nurturing. It was useful to have so many experienced members, who were encouraging, uplifting, and inspiring to facilitating us embracing our experiences and think about ways forward. Keeping the flames of hope burning bright. The pebbles in the ocean of change matters.”

“Keep up the excellent work. Your space is much needed by those BAME therapists out there and those training to get out there.”

“I imagined this year’s BAATN conference was likely to be a casualty of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, though virtual, my soul did get that important nourishment after all. One of the few forums where I gain both spiritually and professionally. I’m very thankful for it.” – Wayne Mertins-Brown

“Loved the whole experience and being in virtual room group to speaking openly about how it is to be a person of colour and as a therapist.”