BAATN Midlands Reading Group

Hosted by Jill Morgan

Next workshop: 4th July 2020, 2:30 to 4:30pm
Venue: Carrs Lane Conference Centre, Carrs Lane, Birmingham, B4 7SX

This is an Open Practitioner Event

Each quarter BAATN Midlands will hold a Reading Group featuring a book relevant to the themes of race and racism. In the Reading Group, we will discuss the background of the authors, the sociopolitical contexts in which the book was written, discuss any points raised in the group and consider the book’s relevance to practice.

“Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy?”

In this group, we will be discussing the 2017 revised and updated edition of the 1997 bestseller exploring the psychology of race and racism in the United States: ‘Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?‘ by Psychologist and president emerita of Spelman College, Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum.

Media Reviews:

“We don’t talk about race in America, but we must start if we are going to heal this broken country–and Beverly Tatum’s book is exactly the conversation opener we should be using.”–Jodi Picoult, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Small Great Things

“Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria was a landmark publication when it appeared in 1997. Twenty years later this updated edition is as fresh, poignant and timely as ever.”–Earl Lewis, President, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

“An unusually sensitive work about the racial barriers that still divide us in so many areas of life.”–Jonathan Kozol

Who should attend the workshop 

Psychotherapists, Counsellors, Psychologists, holistic therapists, psychiatrists and individuals involved in the mental health field, caring professions and those concerned about black mental health.

Venue: Carrs Lane Conference Centre, Carrs Lane, Birmingham, B4 7SX (fully accessible venue)
Date: 4th July 2020
Registration 14:30 Start – End 16:30

Cost: This event is free to Directory, Practitioner and Student members, £10 for Non-members. For Non-members booking reservations without payment will be held for 1 week before being offered to another person.

Find out about more events in the Midlands 

The Group Agreement

Each quarter BAATN Midlands will hold a Reading Group featuring a book relevant to the themes of race and racism. In the Reading Group, we will discuss the background of the authors, the socio-political contexts in which the book was written, discuss any points raised in the group and consider the book’s relevance to practice.

As Reading Group attendees:

  • We recognise the need for confidentiality and its limitations when safeguarding actions are warranted and
  • are aware of the emotional impact of discussing issues concerning race and racism. Attendees are encouraged to ensure their own self-care and take a break from reading group activities whenever needed. We are aware of the right to be able to agree/feel agreed with and disagree/feel disagreed with one another.
  • We are mindful of how we deliver our opinions on the book/text.
  • We try not to speak over each other. When someone is speaking, the floor is fully theirs.
  • We are accepting and supportive of where people of the group are at. We recognise that some attendees might not have had the possibility to have fully read the book; and that sometimes despite intentions, things come up in one’s personal lives. Not having fully read the book should not be an obstacle to attendance and engage in discussions. This reading group is for those that specifically struggle to find time to read. It is hoped that by participating in the Reading Group, in one’s personal life more opportunity is enabled for reading books on Black Issues.

Structure of the Reading Group:

  • Two hours in duration, with a short break.
  • The book/text will be nominated by the reading group participants
  • We will always begin with a check-in at the start of the session and end with a checkout
  • The first half of the session involves looking at our personal reaction to the book, considering various contexts for instance what we know of the author, the intended audience and sense of community and politics it raises. After a break of 10-15 minutes, the second half of the seminar looks at the book’s relevance to clinical practice. There may, of course, be some overlaps between the two halves of the session.
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Past Reading Groups 

Reading group on the 29th Feb 20 

This group discussed the Sunday Times bestseller: ‘Natives: Race and Class in the Ruins of Empire’ by artist, writer and historian Akala.

Media Reviews:

‘My book of the year. It’s personal, historical, political, and it speaks to where we are now. This is the book I’ve been waiting for – for years.’ – Benjamin Zephaniah

‘Part biography, part polemic, this powerful, wide-ranging study picks apart the British myth of meritocracy.’ – David Olusoga, The Guardian

‘Akala is at his best destroying the comfortable myths that are invoked by white fragility to downplay attempts to correct the historical record … Akala makes it clear that he is not brimming with optimism. But reading Natives – witnessing the kind of disruptive, aggressive intellect that a new generation is closely watching – I can’t help but be just that.’ – Afua Hirsch, Observer

‘What I love about this book is it’s kind of like a testimony, a story of contemporary London. He is like one of the Baldwins or Hooks of our generation, who walks among us, you know? When he theorises, it’s from a place of knowing rather than some distant place up above… He is very good at remembering and honouring the experiences that have shaped him, and he applies it in a very real way.’ – Madani Younis, The Guardian