BAATN Spring Seminars

Therapeutic Practice That Speaks Across Cultures

4 weekday seminars in May and June 2019, 6:30 pm, 5 Mins from London Bridge.

Each seminar will be presented by an expert in their field followed by discussion and questions with plenty of opportunities to network with like-minded individuals.

These Seminars are open to Everyone

 

Gurcharan Virdee

Wed, 15th May 2019 – Approaches to therapy and healing for women and girls who have experienced SGBV (Sexual and gender-based violence)

Eli Anderson

Thurs, 23rd May 2019 – The Power of the Elder

Dr Reenee Singh

Wed, 28th May 2019 – Intimate Strangers? Working with Intercultural Couples 

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

Tue, 11 June 2019 – Inner Lives of Troubled Young British Muslims: Needs and Responses 

Cost: Individuals £20, BAATN Members £15, Student £15, BAATN Student member £10 – email connect@baatn.org.uk for 20% discount for booking all 4 seminars.

Venue: The Psychosynthesis Trust, 92-94 Tooley Street, London Bridge, London SE1 2TH

Timetable

6:45 – Doors open (tea coffee and networking)

7:15 – Presentation by main speaker

8:00 – Break

8:15 – Discussion and questions

9:00 – Close and networking

Who should attend these seminars? Psychotherapists, Counsellors, Psychologists, holistic therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and individuals involved in the mental health field or caring professions. Also anyone who is interested in self-exploration to help them with work and personal relationships. 

Gurcharan Virdee

Gurcharan Virdee

Approaches to therapy and healing for women and girls who have experienced SGBV (Sexual and gender-based violence)

Survival or therapy? Sexual and Gender based violence in conflict and post conflict regions

Wednesday, 15 May 2019

 

Gurcharan was a founder member of Southall Black Sisters in 1979. She worked as a child protection co-ordinator in London and as a senior lecturer at the University of East London teaching the professional Diploma and MA on social work and undergraduate degree on Social Anthropology of South Asia. For the last twenty years, Gurcharan has had an international career working for different UN agencies, donors, INGO/NGOs and national governments as a senior gender and social development specialist. Her experiences span gender equality and gender mainstreaming, SGBV, human rights, the rule of law (both formal and informal) and child protection in transitional, conflict and fragile regions.

Her country experiences include Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, the Russian Federation, Central Asia, the Baltic States, Eastern Europe, Jordon, Somalia, Kenya and Mongolia. Her published works are based on her experiences and research with different international organisations. She is I currently undertaking ethnographic research on Gender and Policing in Punjab, India. She writing two books: one based on my experiences in Afghanistan focusing on Violence Against Women and Girls and the second book is on my family history exploring themes on migration to East Africa and later the UK, identity politics, gender and being the ‘other’ in one’s own family and community.

This seminar will reflect and explore therapeutic and experimental approaches to therapy and healing for women and girls on SGBV that demonstrates sustainable impact. What are the opportunities for therapeutic practitioners in the UK to learn from the lived realities and coping strategies of women and girls living in countries of conflict?

Gurcharan Virdee: BA (Hons), CQSW, MA (Anthropology – South Asia) Senior Gender, SGBV, Child Protection and Good Governance Expert

Working in countries of conflicts is a daily struggle related to security to negotiate and coordinate access to affected communities, displaced populations on the move and vulnerable groups of women and girls. Additional challenges to providing therapeutic interventions are due to language, illiteracy, no or weak infrastructures (i.e. health), limited resources, rapidly changing situation on the ground, restrictions on women and girls movements, and the capacity to train national staff. Models of therapy such as one-stop referrals centres, mental health and crisis interventions imported from the West are difficult to indigenize, thus implement programmes at national and local levels. Yet the West continues to fund and support such models, spending millions of dollars, and at worst, placing women and girls at further risk including reputational risks of stigma and shame. Exploring Afghanistan and Somalia as case studies, whilst the contexts are different there are similarities on interventions to support the healing of women and girls who have experienced sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) during humanitarian crisis and post conflict. Asking women and girls what kind of support they wanted to heal from SGBV – their response was not what the humanitarian international community predicted.

This seminar will reflect and explore therapeutic and experimental approaches to therapy and healing for women and girls that have experienced SGBV (Sexual and gender-based violence), that demonstrates sustainable impact. What are the opportunities for therapeutic practitioners in the UK to learn from the lived realities and coping strategies of women and girls living in countries of conflict?...

Gurcharan was a founder member of Southall Black Sisters in 1979. She worked as a child protection co-ordinator in London and as a senior lecturer at the University of East London teaching the professional Diploma and MA on social work and undergraduate degree on Social Anthropology of South Asia. For the last twenty years, Gurcharan has had an international career working for different UN agencies, donors, INGO/NGOs and national governments as a senior gender and social development specialist. Her experiences span gender equality and gender mainstreaming, SGBV, human rights, the rule of law (both formal and informal) and child protection in transitional, conflict and fragile regions.

Her country experiences include Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, the Russian Federation, Central Asia, the Baltic States, Eastern Europe, Jordon, Somalia, Kenya and Mongolia. Her published works are based on her experiences and research with different international organisations. She is I currently undertaking ethnographic research on Gender and Policing in Punjab, India. She writing two books: one based on my experiences in Afghanistan focusing on Violence Against Women and Girls and the second book is on my family history exploring themes on migration to East Africa and later the UK, identity politics, gender and being the ‘other’ in one’s own family and community.

This seminar will reflect and explore therapeutic and experimental approaches to therapy and healing for women and girls that have experienced SGBV (Sexual and gender-based violence), that demonstrates sustainable impact. What are the opportunities for therapeutic practitioners in the UK to learn from the lived realities and coping strategies of women and girls living in countries of conflict?

Gurcharan Virdee: BA (Hons), CQSW, MA (Anthropology – South Asia) Senior Gender, SGBV, Child Protection and Good Governance Expert

Working in countries of conflicts is a daily struggle related to security to negotiate and coordinate access to affected communities, displaced populations on the move and vulnerable groups of women and girls. Additional challenges to providing therapeutic interventions are due to language, illiteracy, no or weak infrastructures (i.e. health), limited resources, rapidly changing situation on the ground, restrictions on women and girls movements, and the capacity to train national staff. Models of therapy such as one-stop referrals centres, mental health and crisis interventions imported from the West are difficult to indigenize, thus implement programmes at national and local levels. Yet the West continues to fund and support such models, spending millions of dollars, and at worst, placing women and girls at further risk including reputational risks of stigma and shame. Exploring Afghanistan and Somalia as case studies, whilst the contexts are different there are similarities on interventions to support the healing of women and girls who have experienced sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) during humanitarian crisis and post conflict. Asking women and girls what kind of support they wanted to heal from SGBV – their response was not what the humanitarian international community predicted.

Eli Anderson

Eli Anderson

The Power of the Elder 

Thursday, 23 May 2019 

The seminar is designed to celebrate, but also to partially explore the debate concerning the position of the Elder in our society. The critical role Elders must play includes elements such as dignity, respect, and intergenerational knowledge, cultural and Social Capital.

About Eli

Eli Anderson is a Director of StoryAID, a social enterprise which has 30 years of applied knowledge and expertise in developing and implementing collaborative projects and schemes to enhance the recovery and Interprofessional education of healthcare professionals in the public, charitable and private agencies and institutions from healthcare, education, cultural and creative industries. StoryAID also supports the recovery of patients within neuro-rehabilitation units in two major teaching hospital trusts.

Eli has studied Mindfulness based on Cognitive Therapy and Mental Health, Youth & Community work, and Narrative Medicine. He is a Narrative Coach and NLP practitioner. He has been responsible for the management and transformation of Youth & Community and Play Services developing innovative projects collaborating with commercial, charitable agencies and the NHS, Education and Justice establishments.

Eli has co-collaborated pan-London and European projects that encourage people to develop their creative writing. Eli Anderson teaches courses in Storytelling in Morley College. He is playwright, music tutor, and has had storyteller-in-residence positions at London colleges and with the National Health Service. The work of StoryAid encourages participants be involved in the process to rediscover and reconnect with their stories, in a manner that respects their dignity and rights.

The seminar is designed to celebrate, but also to partially explore the debate concerning the position of the Elder in our society. The critical role Elders must play includes elements such as dignity, respect, and intergenerational knowledge, cultural and Social Capital....

The seminar is designed to celebrate, but also to partially explore the debate concerning the position of the Elder in our society. The critical role Elders must play includes elements such as dignity, respect, and intergenerational knowledge, cultural and Social Capital.

About Eli

Eli Anderson is a Director of StoryAID, a social enterprise which has 30 years of applied knowledge and expertise in developing and implementing collaborative projects and schemes to enhance the recovery and Interprofessional education of healthcare professionals in the public, charitable and private agencies and institutions from healthcare, education, cultural and creative industries. StoryAID also supports the recovery of patients within neuro-rehabilitation units in two major teaching hospital trusts.

Eli has studied Mindfulness based on Cognitive Therapy and Mental Health, Youth & Community work, and Narrative Medicine. He is a Narrative Coach and NLP practitioner. He has been responsible for the management and transformation of Youth & Community and Play Services developing innovative projects collaborating with commercial, charitable agencies and the NHS, Education and Justice establishments.

Eli has co-collaborated pan-London and European projects that encourage people to develop their creative writing. Eli Anderson teaches courses in Storytelling in Morley College. He is playwright, music tutor, and has had storyteller-in-residence positions at London colleges and with the National Health Service. The work of StoryAid encourages participants be involved in the process to rediscover and reconnect with their stories, in a manner that respects their dignity and rights.

Dr Reenee Singh

Dr Reenee Singh

Intimate Strangers? Working with Intercultural Couples

Tuesday, 28 May 2019

In the U.K., one in every ten couples is intercultural, and the recent Royal wedding highlighted a growing trend in marrying across ‘race’, culture, class and nationality. The London Intercultural Couples Centre at the Child and Family Practice was founded in 2016, to address the unique challenges faced by intercultural couples, whilst recognising their strengths and resiliencies.

This seminar will review the international research and literature on intercultural couples. Based on the clinical work and research carried out at the London Intercultural Couples Centre, the seminar will explore key themes and processes for intercultural couples. It will include possible clinical tools and interventions, when working with such couples.

Dr. Reenee Singh

Dr. Reenee Singh is the Founding Director of the London Intercultural Couples Centre at the Child and Famlly Practice in London. She has been recently appointed the CEO of the Association of Family Therapy. Reenee is a Consultant Systemic Psychotherapist, the co-director of the Tavistock Family Therapy and Systemic Research Centre. She was the Editor of the Journal of Family Therapy and has written and published widely in the areas of ‘race’, culture and qualitative research.

This seminar will review the international research and literature on intercultural couples. Based on the clinical work and research carried out at the London Intercultural Couples Centre, the seminar will explore key themes and processes for intercultural couples. It will include possible clinical tools and interventions, when working with such couples....

In the U.K., one in every ten couples is intercultural, and the recent Royal wedding highlighted a growing trend in marrying across ‘race’, culture, class and nationality. The London Intercultural Couples Centre at the Child and Family Practice was founded in 2016, to address the unique challenges faced by intercultural couples, whilst recognising their strengths and resiliencies.

This seminar will review the international research and literature on intercultural couples. Based on the clinical work and research carried out at the London Intercultural Couples Centre, the seminar will explore key themes and processes for intercultural couples. It will include possible clinical tools and interventions, when working with such couples.

Dr. Reenee Singh

Dr. Reenee Singh is the Founding Director of the London Intercultural Couples Centre at the Child and Famlly Practice in London. She has been recently appointed the CEO of the Association of Family Therapy. Reenee is a Consultant Systemic Psychotherapist, the co-director of the Tavistock Family Therapy and Systemic Research Centre. She was the Editor of the Journal of Family Therapy and has written and published widely in the areas of ‘race’, culture and qualitative research.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

Inner Lives of Troubled Young British Muslims: Needs and Responses

Date TBC

 

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown came to the UK in 1972 from Uganda after completing her undergraduate degree at Makerere University where she was awarded an exceptional first class degree in English. She went to Oxford as a post-graduate student and was awarded an M.Phil in literature in1975. She is a journalist who has written for The Guardian, Observer, The New York Times, Time Magazine, Newsweek, The Evening Standard, the Mail and other newspapers and was a regular columnist on The Independent for 18 years.

She now writes columns for I newspaper and also occasional features and columns for the Sunday Times Magazine, Daily Mirror and Mail on Sunday. She is a radio and television broadcaster and author of several books. Her book, No Place Like Home, well received by critics, was an autobiographical account of a twice removed immigrant. From 1996 to 2001 she was a Research Fellow at the Institute for Public Policy Research which published True Colours on the role of government on racial attitudes. Tony Blair launched the book in March 1999. She was a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Centre until 2003. In 2000 she published, Who Do We Think We Are? published in the US too, an acclaimed book on the state of the British nation and another book, After Multiculturalism which looks at the globalised future. She advises various key institutions on race matters. She is also a regular international public speaker in Britain, other European countries, North America and Asian nations. She is a diversity adviser to global companies and organisations. She was a governor of the Royal Shakespeare Company and is on the board of Metal, an innovative arts organisation headed by Jude Kelley who runs the South Bank Centre in London.

In 2001 came the publication of the paperback of Who Do we Think We Are? and Mixed Feelings, a book on mixed race Britons which has been praised by all those who have reviewed it to date. In June 1999, she received an honorary degree from the Open University for her contributions to social justice.

In 2001 she was appointed an MBE for services to journalism in the new year’s honours list, a medal she returned in 2003 as a protest against the illegal war in Iraq. In 2002 she was awarded the prestigious George Orwell prize for political journalism. In July 2003 Liverpool John Moore’s University made her an Honorary Fellow. In September 2004, she was awarded an honorary degree by the Oxford Brookes University . In April 2004, her film on Islam for Channel 4 won an award. In September 2004, a collection of her journalistic writings, Some of My Best Friends Are was published by Politicos. In 2005/6 she went on stage with her one woman show, written and performed by her, commissioned and directed by the Royal Shakespeare Company as part of their new work festival. In 2006 the show had two London runs and went to other locations. It was highly praised by the Times, Independent and local paper critics. In 2007 the show was taken to India – to great acclaim.

In 2007, she was appointed Hon, Visiting Professor in Journalism at Cardiff University. In that same year she started up a charity- Muslims for Secular Democracy to promote democratic values among young British Muslims. In 2008, she was appointed Visiting Professor of Journalism at the University of Lincoln and Visiting Professor at the University of the West of England. I 2008 she was awarded an hon doctorate by York St John University. Her new book, The Settler’s Cookbook, a food memoir on East African Asians was published in the spring of 2009 and was book of the week on BBC Radio4. It has been described by critics as ‘groundbreaking’ ‘wonderful’ and ‘elegiac’. Her book, Exotic England. It was published in March 2015. She was awarded a Winston Churchill Travel Fellowship to research the book. She has been voted one of the top ten most powerful Asians in Britain and one of the most influential voices on the left. In May 2011, she was invited to speak at a prestigious TED salon in London and described the theme of her new book to a surprised and very interested audience. In January she took up a part-time, tenured post as Professor of Journalism at London’s Middlesex University.

She is the editor of Provocations, a series of polemical books published by Biteback. Her own book Refusing the Veil is part of this series of thought provoking publications. Her second polemic in this series, In Defence of Political Correctness, was published in 2018.
From 2005 to 2012, she was on the diversity and inclusion council of the global pharma company Novartis. She has written extensively in articles and books about health and race, health and exclusion and health and diversity. In 2013 she was appointed co-chair of a major project led by the Centre for Patient Safety and Service Quality set up by Imperial College and Trust.

She frequently appears on BBC’s Any Questions and Question Time, Channel4 News and other current affairs programmes and has presented programmes on radio and TV.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown came to the UK in 1972 from Uganda after completing her undergraduate degree at Makerere University. She went to Oxford as a post-graduate student and was awarded an M.Phil in literature in1975. She is a journalist who has written for The Guardian, Observer, The New York Times, Time Magazine...

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown came to the UK in 1972 from Uganda after completing her undergraduate degree at Makerere University where she was awarded an exceptional first class degree in English. She went to Oxford as a post-graduate student and was awarded an M.Phil in literature in1975. She is a journalist who has written for The Guardian, Observer, The New York Times, Time Magazine, Newsweek, The Evening Standard, the Mail and other newspapers and was a regular columnist on The Independent for 18 years. She now writes columns for I newspaper and also occasional features and columns for the Sunday Times Magazine, Daily Mirror and Mail on Sunday. She is a radio and television broadcaster and author of several books. Her book, No Place Like Home, well received by critics, was an autobiographical account of a twice removed immigrant. From 1996 to 2001 she was a Research Fellow at the Institute for Public Policy Research which published True Colours on the role of government on racial attitudes. Tony Blair launched the book in March 1999. She was a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Centre until 2003. In 2000 she published, Who Do We Think We Are? published in the US too, an acclaimed book on the state of the British nation and another book, After Multiculturalism which looks at the globalised future. She advises various key institutions on race matters. She is also a regular international public speaker in Britain, other European countries, North America and Asian nations. She is a diversity adviser to global companies and organisations. She was a governor of the Royal Shakespeare Company and is on the board of Metal, an innovative arts organisation headed by Jude Kelley who runs the South Bank Centre in London.

In 2001 came the publication of the paperback of Who Do we Think We Are? and Mixed Feelings, a book on mixed race Britons which has been praised by all those who have reviewed it to date. In June 1999, she received an honorary degree from the Open University for her contributions to social justice.

In 2001 she was appointed an MBE for services to journalism in the new year’s honours list, a medal she returned in 2003 as a protest against the illegal war in Iraq. In 2002 she was awarded the prestigious George Orwell prize for political journalism. In July 2003 Liverpool John Moore’s University made her an Honorary Fellow. In September 2004, she was awarded an honorary degree by the Oxford Brookes University . In April 2004, her film on Islam for Channel 4 won an award. In September 2004, a collection of her journalistic writings, Some of My Best Friends Are was published by Politicos. In 2005/6 she went on stage with her one woman show, written and performed by her, commissioned and directed by the Royal Shakespeare Company as part of their new work festival. In 2006 the show had two London runs and went to other locations. It was highly praised by the Times, Independent and local paper critics. In 2007 the show was taken to India – to great acclaim.

In 2007, she was appointed Hon, Visiting Professor in Journalism at Cardiff University. In that same year she started up a charity- Muslims for Secular Democracy to promote democratic values among young British Muslims. In 2008, she was appointed Visiting Professor of Journalism at the University of Lincoln and Visiting Professor at the University of the West of England. I 2008 she was awarded an hon doctorate by York St John University. Her new book, The Settler’s Cookbook, a food memoir on East African Asians was published in the spring of 2009 and was book of the week on BBC Radio4. It has been described by critics as ‘groundbreaking’ ‘wonderful’ and ‘elegiac’. Her book, Exotic England. It was published in March 2015. She was awarded a Winston Churchill Travel Fellowship to research the book. She has been voted one of the top ten most powerful Asians in Britain and one of the most influential voices on the left. In May 2011, she was invited to speak at a prestigious TED salon in London and described the theme of her new book to a surprised and very interested audience. In January she took up a part-time, tenured post as Professor of Journalism at London’s Middlesex University.

She is the editor of Provocations, a series of polemical books published by Biteback. Her own book Refusing the Veil is part of this series of thought provoking publications. Her second polemic in this series, In Defence of Political Correctness, was published in 2018.

From 2005 to 2012, she was on the diversity and inclusion council of the global pharma company Novartis. She has written extensively in articles and books about health and race, health and exclusion and health and diversity. In 2013 she was appointed co-chair of a major project led by the Centre for Patient Safety and Service Quality set up by Imperial College and Trust.
She frequently appears on BBC’s Any Questions and Question Time, Channel4 News and other current affairs programmes and has presented programmes on radio and TV.

Wed, 15th May 2019 – Approaches to therapy and healing for women and girls who have experienced SGBV (Sexual and gender-based violence) –  Gurcharan Virdee

Thurs, 23rd May 2019 – The Power of the Elder  –  Eli Anderson

Wed, 28th May 2019 – Intimate Strangers? Working with Intercultural Couples – Dr Reenee Singh

Tue, 11th June 2019 – Inner Lives of Troubled Young British Muslims: Needs and Responses – Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

Door opens 6:45 PM – Seminar starts at 7:15pm till 9:00 PM

Individuals £20, BAATN Members £15, Student £15, BAATN Student member £10 [email connect@baatn.org.uk for 20% discount for all 4 seminars.

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